✽ The House of Mirth Author Edith Wharton – Thegreatwallonline.us

The House of Mirth Since Its Publication In 1905 The House Of Mirth Has Commanded Attention For The Sharpness Of Wharton S Observations And The Power Of Her Style A Lucid, Disturbing Analysis Of The Stifling Limitations Imposed Upon Women Of Her Generation, Wharton S Tale Of Lily Bart S Search For A Husband Of Position In New York Society, And Betrayal Of Her Own Heart, Transformed The Traditional Novel Of Manners Into An Arrestingly Modern Document Of Cultural Anthropology With Incisive Contemporary Analysis, The Introduction By A Leading Scholar Of American Literature Updates This Increasingly Important Work.

<KINDLE> ✽ The House of Mirth  Author Edith Wharton – Thegreatwallonline.us
  • Paperback
  • 329 pages
  • The House of Mirth
  • Edith Wharton
  • English
  • 03 June 2017
  • 9780199538102

10 thoughts on “The House of Mirth


  1. says:

    Poor, lovely Lily BartHer tragic storywill break your heartShe runs in the best circles Wears the right clothesAnd flirts with rich menBut everyone knowsThat she needs to marrySomeone and fast At 29 her looks won t lastShe s ringing up debtsBorrowing from menAnd displeasing their wivesNot to mention her friend Lawrence Selden, a lawyer but not very rich It s Gilded Age New York And life s a bitch If you re not old money Like the Trenors, DorsetsAnd that odd Percy GryceThe most you can do is play very nice Like Sam Rosedale, the BrysThe Gormers and such,Who buy their way in i.e., never go dutch Just remember this cliqueWho summer in Newport and vacate in FranceCan shut you out of the social danceWhich brings me back to Lily BartWho s clearly not as smart as she seemsStepping right into a terrible schemeAnd refusing to clear her nameOr go along with the game Even though, in the end, it causes her shame Does she have a choice A tragic flaw Or is her inaction the point of it all Is her refusal to play her hand A critique of women s rolesIn a world ruled by Man And what of that endingThat seems out of place I won t give a spoiler that d be a disgrace But melodrama and tears crop up near the endWhen Lily appearsTo want for a friendHer author, Ms Wharton, knew this world well It looked like heavenBut was nasty as hellIt s a fine portrait of Old New York But please don t forget another great workAn even better one, writtenSome 16 years hence ...


  2. says:

    On occasions like this, I rue the absence of a tragedy shelf or some variation of the same because mere melancholia seems too modest, too equivocal a word to convey the kind of heartbreak Lily Bart s story inflicted on me.It is, perhaps, apposite that I came to this with my mind still fresh from Anita Desai s stirring homage to a resolutely single, unsung fictional heroine who holds together a disintegrating family, unacknowledged, misunderstood, left behind and forgotten Clear Light of Day Because Desai s Bim and Wharton s Lily are both flawed figures who manage to stand erect, weathering storms of hostile circumstances that whittle down their will to live and sense of self worth Even when the vicissitudes of fate leave them psychologically battered and dying inside, they manage to maintain their slippery grip on ideals that cost them dearly And how many tragedies can we think of, in which the female protagonist s tragic status is not a mere matter of simple victimization at the hands of patriarchal figures of authority but is, instead, locked in a complex configuration of missed chances, reluctance to surrender self esteem in exchange for societal approval and an unsympathetic social milieu She was realizing for the first time that a woman s dignity may cost to keep up than her carriage and that t...


  3. says:

    There s actually little mirth in this story that ends in tragedy I read this after enjoying the author s Ethan Frome and realizing again what a good writer Edith Wharton is Lily Bart belong to the jet set of the early 1900 s She hangs out in New York mansions, Newport and the Riviera As did the author Lily was from a wealthy family that spent down its fortune and then her parents died Now she s looking for a husband with money She had some opportunities to marry earlier but she finds she s waited a bit long she s 29 now and has to consider pompous, milksop 40 year old mama s boys, and even someone who might ultimately decide to do her the honor of boring her for life Another is a portentous little ass Without a mother she doesn t have anyone to play the field for her and line up men behind the scenes Her income is barely enough to keep up with her clothing budget and card playing money She lives with various aunts for periods of time I m amazed at how much she and all these these folks talk about their money and money problems in casual conv...


  4. says:

    Lily Bart, the protagonist of Edith Wharton s stunning first novel, is introduced to the reader as a young woman traveling within high society While her blood and wealth may place her on the fringe of that society, her pale beauty as it is continuously characterized throughout the novel elevates her within its ranks Lily is marriage material And within Manhattan s high society at the turn of the century, women are meant to marry and in order to marry women are meant to maintain a reputation of pale innocence indeed, they must.Lily hesitates to question these two fundamental rules that bind her, save on rare occasion in conversation with Lawrence Selden, the man it seems she would marry if the choice were hers, and who stands far enough outside Lily s circle to critique that circle from an apparent distance Selden, however, presents Lily with several problems First, Selden himself is hardly able to separate himself from the rules of Manhattan society, even if he so desired to or so imagined the independence of his perspective Second, Selden serves as preacher, counselor, and sounding post to Lily with respect to the pitfalls of high society, but while Selden s efforts to take high society off its pedestal strike a chord with Lily, and indeed echo many of her own thoughts, Selden never presents Lily with a viable alternative to the only circle and the only set of rules she knows.The final problem that first emerges from the relation...


  5. says:

    Lily Bart, born poor but from a blue blood family, grew up privileged, well her mother pretended they had wealth, always telling her hard working husband, she will not live like a pig He succumbs to an early grave, broke, at the turn of the century 20th , that is, the mother spends money, they haven t got, going to Europe, buying expensive clothes, jewelry, furniture, all for the sake of appearances, their friends, in High Society are very well to do Since childhood, Lily is told one thing, never trained for anything else, her object in life, marry a rich man, restore the family honor, love doesn t matter, the only important concern, Gold When her mother dies too, in poverty, discouraged, Lily is alone at the age of 19 Aunt Peniston, affluent, widowed sister, of Lily s father, surprisingly takes her in, she keeps mostly to herself, aloof, will not help Miss Bart, pay bills, Lily has a meager income , and her niece continues in New York society, with her friends, buying extravagant dresses, gambling at cards, bridge, a maid employed, visiting the houses of people, who live lavishly, in their own little world Mrs.Trenor, her best friend is always inviting her to stay and enjoy the good life, with the snobs, at her mansion Lily is glad to get out of her Aunt Julia s, boring, dowdy home Her bills go unpaid, Lily must marry soon, but is too fastidious, for her own good, meeting the very shy millionaire Percy Gryce, dull, tongue...


  6. says:

    Edith Wharton sets the New York social stage of the early twentieth century for a succession of short scenes that glitter with glossy superficiality Lightning, backdrops and lush costumes are put on display to create a natural effect in this tableaux vivant of a novel, where Lily Bart stands out as the most stunning living painting ever She is the leading actress of this theatrical narrative, a delicate flower bred for exhibition and ornament whose beauty shines with the precise effortless grace and charm that will enable her to achieve her goals Being an orphaned, single woman of twenty nine with frugal tastes Lily knows that in the gilded cage in which she blossoms and withers the only path to success is to become a saleable commodity that some wealthy gentleman will buy into marriage.It s easy to find fault in Lily s dignified composure Wharton treats her tragic heroine harshly She is vain, snobbish, selfish and as shallow as the stage of artificiality where she acts She covets money and social position above gentleness and compassion, her ruthless anti sentimentalism is reflected in the hard glaze of her chiselled, porcelain mask of complacency that in turn conceals her contempt for the parasitic life in which she has imprisoned herself But how much does the financial imperatives of this society in which wealth and not morality determines status influence in the making...


  7. says:

    The House of Mirth just might be to The Age of Innocence what Tom Sawyer is to Huck Finn that is, only but a stepping stone towards a profound greatness although why I used that Twain analogy is a mystery even to me I find that brand of American Lit a bit overrated Age of Innocence is stupendous utterly amazing On the other hand, The House of Mirth describes the downward spiral of one, Miss Lily Bart, misunderstood by her social set, her particular New York niche Her story is a tragedy as deep as Jude the Obscure s her plight is both melancholic devastating New York has always been a perfect place in which to achieve some sort of victimhood Another attribute the story is severely overwritten I say attribute because that is precisely Mrs Wharton s style you read beautiful sentences, many, to realize that all she really wanted to portray was a character sitting down on his ass, or she tries to show particular psyches without the modern, less roundabout, most efficient manner of, say, Virginia Woolf alas, if Mrs Wharton had continued to write well into the 30 s we may have seen a different, radical literary style The novel is trapped between novelty modernity antiquity a European America Sure,...


  8. says:

    Reading Edith Wharton s second novel The House of Mirth was like being kidnapped by Barbary pirates and held for ransom for ten fortnights not a comfort, but an adventure Published in 1905, this tale of Miss Lily Bart a young woman held prisoner by New York high society for her grace and beauty until her dependence on wealthy patrons makes her vulnerable to their whims carried me off against my will and held me with jeweled prose, breathless detail to character and droll wit Wharton s milieu was alien to me and her writing often so intricate that I wanted to run home to John Steinbeck, but now that the experience is over, find myself changed by it.Book I begins in a nation with places to go and people to see, or Grand Central Station to be exact Bachelor attorney Lawrence Selden returns to New York from the country and spots twenty nine year old socialite Lily Bart at the station, waiting alone Thrilled to find herself unattended no , Lily makes the impulsive decision to join Selden for tea in his apartment on Madison Avenue Lily is orphaned and lives with her wealthy aunt Mrs Peniston Though she is expected ...


  9. says:

    I have read almost all of Edith Wharton s writing I have the highest regard for her work She was overshadowed by Fitzgerald and Hemingway in her day but even so she won the Pulitzer prize in 1921 for her novel The Age of Innocence The House of Mirth was one of her early novels and my favorite, although I like all of her novels.Lily Bart, the protagonist in The House of Mirth, is such a captivating and tragic figure that she has stayed in my mind for years Of co...


  10. says:

    What a piece of artIs our Lily BartSurrounded by men who don t need much urgin Yet Lily is a 29 year old virginShe s a part of a truly disgusting society the filthy rich of New York, 1905 all they do is party till five in the morning and have discreet affairs and play bridge for money and get waited on hand and foot snap your fingers once for a Faberge egg on toast, twice for a new hat made of ptarmigan feathers and rush off to Monaco and gamble and party and have affairs and snap their fingers for a new hat made of tigers eyelashes and oversee charitable foundations to help the limbless and get huffy if the gold plates of leftover anteater brains aren t cleared away quick enough.First they all love Lily Bart because she s tall and lovely and says the right thing to everybody But clearly she hasn t said enough of the right things or she d already have been married to a millionaire Something holds her back from making such an obvious move this leaves her in a position where she becomes a convenient woman to take the blame when there is some blame shifting to be done, so she ends up stumbling around like a wounded okapi and the pack turns on her or really just shoves her to the side and moves on Edith skewers the appalling attitudes of the rich Judy knew it must be horrid for poor Lily to have to stop to consider whether she could afford real lace on her petticoats, and not to have a motor car and a steam yacht at her orders but the daily friction of unpai...

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