[PDF / Epub] ☆ The Ghost Map By Steven Johnson – Thegreatwallonline.us

The Ghost Map From Steven Johnson, The Dynamic Thinker Routinely Compared To James Gleick, Dava Sobel, And Malcolm Gladwell, The Ghost Map Is A Riveting Page Turner About A Real Life Historical Hero, Dr John Snow It S The Summer Of 1854, And London Is Just Emerging As One Of The First Modern Cities In The World But Lacking The Infrastructure Garbage Removal, Clean Water, Sewers Necessary To Support Its Rapidly Expanding Population, The City Has Become The Perfect Breeding Ground For A Terrifying Disease No One Knows How To Cure As The Cholera Outbreak Takes Hold, A Physician And A Local Curate Are Spurred To Action And Ultimately Solve The Most Pressing Medical Riddle Of Their Time.In A Triumph Of Multidisciplinary Thinking, Johnson Illuminates The Intertwined Histories And Interconnectedness Of The Spread Of Disease, Contagion Theory, The Rise Of Cities, And The Nature Of Scientific Inquiry, Offering Both A Riveting History And A Powerful Explanation Of How It Has Shaped The World We Live In.

[PDF / Epub] ☆ The Ghost Map  By Steven Johnson – Thegreatwallonline.us
  • Hardcover
  • 299 pages
  • The Ghost Map
  • Steven Johnson
  • English
  • 09 October 2018
  • 1594489254

10 thoughts on “The Ghost Map


  1. says:

    WARNING Do not read this review if you are squeamish Or eating.This book is about cholera, and as a result, the author uses an impressive number of words for shit including excrement, ordure, human waste, and the Victorian euphemism night soil. And shit, of course Johnson explains that a key question in the development of civilization has always been What are we going to do with all this shit This book dramatically improved my vocabulary regarding topics related to 1850s London For insta WARNING Do not read thi...


  2. says:

    By turns thought provoking and irritating, The Ghost Map meanders from its central story how an unorthodox physician found the source of a cholera epidemic that swept through London in 1854 into a host of other issues Expecting astraightforward account of the unraveling of this medical mystery, I set this book aside twice in frustration, bored with the author s tendency to stretch out the narrative, and particularly his repeated examination of the hold the miasma paradigm had upon By turns thought provoking and irritating, The Ghost Map meanders from its central story how an unorthodox physician found the source of a cholera epidemic that swept through London in 1854 into a host of other issues Expecting astraightforward account of the unraveling of this medical mystery, I set this book aside twice in frustration, bored with the author s tendency to stretch out the narrative, and particularly his repeated examination of the hold the miasma paradigm had upon medical minds in the mid nineteenth century He can t seem to get over the fact that all manner of educated and otherwise reasonable people believed that disease was caused by noxious smells His lengthy discussion of the bureaucratic obstacles faced by John Snow, the physician who linked cholera with contamination of drinking water with sewage, begi...


  3. says:

    I read The Ghost Map The Story of London s Most Terrifying Epidemic and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World because I wanted to learnabout a story I thought I knew The story I learned goes like this during a terrible cholera outbreak in Victorian London, Dr John Snow made a revolutionary map of the mortality, was like, Holy crap The deaths all radiate out from this one pump and removed the pump handle, thus halting the epidemic dead in its tracks Turns out, there I read The Ghost Map The Story of London s Most Terrifying Epidemic and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World because I wanted to learnabout a story I thought I knew The story I learned goes like this during a terrible cholera outbreak in Victorian London, Dr John Snow made a revolutionary map of the mortality, was like, Holy crap The deaths all radiate out from this one pump and removed the pump handle, thus halting the epidemic dead in its tracks Turns out, there are about seven books worth of topics in here, wrestling each other for space with brawny arms Were all of them woven seamlessly together into one multifaceted, but logica...


  4. says:

    Cholera is a nasty little bug Once ingested, it forms colonies on the intestinal wall, begins to reproduce with ferocious speed, and proceeds to trick the cells into excreting water rather than absorb it It doesn t really matter of the host dies soon, because millions of new little cholera bacteria rush out of the host with the excreta waiting for the next person to ingest some excrement That is the key The only was to get cholera is by ingesting the excrement of another person so infected Cholera is a nasty little bug Once ingested, it forms colonies on the intestinal wall, begins to reproduce with ferocious speed, and proceeds to trick the cells into excreting water rather than absorb it It doesn t really matter of the host dies soon, because millions of new little cholera bacteria rush out of the host with the excreta waiting for the next person to ingest some excrement That is the key The only was to get cholera is by ingesting the excrement of an...


  5. says:

    3.5 Had seen the PBS special on Snow and his discovery during the cholera epidemic a few months back and this addeddetail to that show Interesting theories abounded, the miasma theory which was a theory almost all favored How they did so much with so little Took hard work without all our modern scientific equipment Snow dedicated his life to the sciences, what he accomplished was nothing short of astonishing Loved all the extraneous information, how tea helped with the lessening of ce ...


  6. says:

    This started out as an engrossing account of the filth and unhygienic conditions of Victorian London, where people literally piled shit in their basements, later to be removed by nightsoil men and a cemetery meant for 3000 bodies ended up containing 80,000 and gravediggers would jump up and down on the bodies in order to make room forIt sounds insane today that anyone could live in those conditions and what s WTF did Victorian London SMELL like However, after about half the book This started out as an engrossing account of the filth and unhygienic conditions of Victorian London, w...


  7. says:

    who knew i d find a nonfiction account of the epidemiological history of cholerainteresting than most YA fantasy this book was disgusting it was also SO FUN well, the first hundred or so pages were the funnest ever five star level for real then the next one hundred were likeeh and the last fifty were uhhh i think i m just going to skip this i m here for plagues and infectious disease not self indulgent waxing romantic on the future of the city as a concept but still.lot of who knew i d find a nonfiction account of the epidemiological history of cholerainteresting than most YA fantasy this book was disgusting it was also SO FUN well, the first hundred or so pages were the funnest ever five star level for real then the next one hundred were likeeh and the last fifty were uhhh i think i m just going to skip this i m here for plagues and infectious disease not self indulgent waxing romantic on the future of the city as a concept but still.lot of question marks today, huh eventhan us...


  8. says:

    view spoiler Bettie s Books hide spoiler


  9. says:

    I enjoyed most of the book, but I hated the concluding chapter I would have preferred it if he had stuck to his subject rather than stringing together a series of personal opinions The discussion of the relative risks of a nuclear holocaust versus bio terrorism via a genetically engineered virus seemed forced Does it really matter The author somehow managed to work in references to both the Iranian nuclear policy and intelligent design in a book about cholera in the nineteenth century Was t I enjoyed most of the book, but I hated the concluding chapter I would have preferred it if he had stuck to his s...


  10. says:

    When I was complaining about how bad Johnson s The Invention of Air was I hadn t realised that I had read and enjoyed his Mind Wide Open Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life Then David and Eric told me to try this one and they are right, this is a far better book The things that annoyed me in The Invention of Air the asides on paradigms and Hegalian dialectics for instance are both in part rehearsed here, but in a way that assumes either that the reader has heard of these ideas When I was complaining about how bad Johnson s The Invention of Air was I hadn t realised that I had read and enjoyed his Mind Wide Open Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life Then David and Eric told me to try this one and they are right, this is a far better book The things that annoyed me in The Invention of Air the asides on paradigms and Hegalian dialectics for instance are both in part rehearsed here, but in a way that assumes either that the reader has heard of these i...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *